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The Poll Tax and Census of Sheep, I549, (Continued from Vol. 1, p. 15)

The Poll Tax and Census of Sheep, I549, (Continued from Vol. 1, p. 15)

Beresford, M. W.

Agricultural History Review,Volume 2 (1954)

Abstract

It is in this atmosphere of proposals and estimates that Parliament discussed and approved the Bill which became 2 and 3 Edward VI c. 36. From a suggestion, the poll tax on sheep became law; the cloth levy was imposed; and instead of rough estimates of the sheep population, the Act set up the machinery to take a census of sheep in every parish, only eleven years later than Thomas Cromwell’s attempt to number the parishioners by the recording of baptisms, marriages, and burials.  The grant of supply to the King did not take any of the conventional forms. The usual subsidy (or tax on personalty) was not granted, nor the tenth-and-fifteenth (the old, and now conventionalized, local tax). Instead, in view of the danger in which the realm stood, the faithful subjects offered a Relief to be paid annually for the three years following.

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