Welsh Castle for Sale


Ruperra Castle, located in southeast Wales, has been put up for sale by its current owner. Built in the 17th century, the castle is being offered for £1.5 million.

Ruperra Castle - photo by John Thorn

The current owner, Ashraf Barakat, has had Ruperra Castle for thirteen years – he bought it hoping to turn the ruined castle and outbuildings into high-end flats and housing. But after years of efforts he was unable to receive planning permission from local authorities, and has now decided to move on.

Mr Barakat told the Western Mail, “I hope it ends up in good hands and I would like it to be developed. If anyone can do anything there it would be great to see it happening.”

He added that he has spent over £1 million on developing property.

Pat Jones-Jenkins, of Ruperra Castle Conservation Trust, is working towards having the castle be sold into public hands. She said:”We have just got to hope that any new owner will realise that there has been a public inquiry and no housing development will be allowed on the ground.

“The castle needs urgent remedial work to stop it from falling down. It is a national monument, so whoever takes it on has a great responsibility.”




The Welsh Assembly government has issued a statement saying they had “no plans to make an offer for it but hopes that a sale, if realised, will help to safeguard the future of this nationally important site.”

The Grade II listed castle was built in 1626 by Sir Thomas Morgan, and King Charles reportedly stayed at the castle in 1645.

The original building burned down in 1785 and was rebuilt in the gothic style, but it was destroyed by fire once again in 1941.

The ruins of Ruperra Castle have been in private ownership since the 1950s, and was bought by Mr Barakat in 1998.

The castle is now being sold by the real-estate agency Savills. Miles Thomas, head of development at Savills, tells the BBC “Castles don’t come on the market every day and this is a rare opportunity for someone with enough imagination and funds to repair and conserve this unique building, which has been recognised as having international significance.

“This could once again become a really breathtaking, historically significant manor house subject to the necessary planning consents.”


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Sources: South Wales Argus, BBC

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