Articles

The Madonna and the Whore: The Victorian Wife and the Victorian Prostitute, a Collision of Virtue and Vice

The Madonna and the Whore: The Victorian Wife and the Victorian Prostitute, a Collision of VirtueVictorian prostitutes and Vice

Coressel, Patti 

Lourdes College Online Narrative History Journal, Volume 9 (2011)

Abstract

The Industrial Revolution in Great Britain brought monumental changes to the country. The shift from the rural, feudal existence of the centuries before to a consumer driven economy, based on capitalism and mass production affected the lives of every inhabitant of England. London from 1840 to 1880 perfectly reflected British industrial might at its height. In London, the population climbed to over two million, when just 50 years before, it had only around 800,000 inhabitants. The incessant growth of industry combined with a steadily Victorian Ladyclimbing population, created deeper divisions between the working and middle classes than ever before. In fact, the shock of this rapid growth essentially forced the city of London to divide into two distinct economic camps: the affluent and the poverty-stricken. The city became a study in duality, both in its public and private spheres.

The dichotomy between the rich and the poor can be traced through every aspect of life in Victorian London. The super-rich lived at the top, nearly untouched by the unwashed masses, while the middle-class, who tried to emulate the aristocracy were unavoidably intertwined with the working poor through commerce and proximity.

Click here to read this article from the Lourdes College Online Narrative History Journal

 

 

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons