Book Review: Winter: A Book for the Season by Felicity Trotman

This book couldn’t have come at a better time. Felicity Trotman has gathered some of the best stories, recipes, poems, and diary entries about the season in one fantastic book: Winter: A Book for the Season. From the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, to pieces Samuel Pepys, Charles Dickens, and Dan Runyon, this delightful collection spans across the […]

1603 AD: Shakespearean London

What kind of a place was Shakespeare’s London? We’re taking a peek into the first lecture of the series, a ‘teaser’ on London in 1603.

Hampton Court Celebrates 500 Years!

Thinking of visiting Hampton Court? Check out this list of things to see while you’re there!

Renaissance Clothing at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Exploring some of the fashion of Renaissance England at the V&A Museum in London.

Never the Twain Shall Part: A Comparison and Analysis of Irish and English Marriage Laws Following the English Conquest of Ireland

The expansion of English rule into Ireland during the reign of the Tudors has generated a tremendous amount of historical writing. Within this subject, several schools of thought have emerged. One has examined the English invasion in light of the Tudors themselves.

CONFERENCES: Beyond Iconophobia: 'Decorative' art and the visual culture of Early Modern England

The following piece is my summary of a brilliant paper given by Tara Hamling on at the Institute of Historical Research on art, religion and visual culture in Early Modern England.

Georgian Christmas: An Eighteenth Century Celebration

During the Georgian period (1714-1820), it was often incorrectly assumed that Christmas wasn’t celebrated with as much gusto as during the Victorian era. Although traditions, foods and celebrations differed, Christmas was actively commemorated during this period.

The Guinea Pig as a pet in Tudor England

A little known painting of three Elizabethan children containing what may be the first portrait of a guinea pig has been uncovered by the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Long-lost toys of late-Victorian children discovered by archaeologists

A collection of long lost toys, just unearthed by a team of archaeologists at The University of Manchester, have shone new light on the commercialisation of childhood by the late Victorians.

The rise of agrarian capitalism and the decline of family farming in England

The rise of agrarian capitalism and the inter-related topics of the growth of large farms and the decline of the English peasantry have been the subject of very extensive investigations by historians of rural society since the early years of the twentieth century.

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