Hampton Court Celebrates 500 Years!

Hampton Court. Photo by Medievalists.net

Thinking of visiting Hampton Court? Check out this list of things to see while you’re there!

5 Creepy Victorian Fads

Victorian Séance

Victorians became enamoured with the occult, mediums, magic, séances and ghosts to name but a few. Here are 5 creepy things that were popular during the Victorian period.

The Role of Religion in the Politics of the Northern Rebellion of 1569

Thomas Percy, Earl of Northumberland

On 14 November, 1569, Thomas Percy, seventh Earl of Northumberland, and Charles Neville, sixth earl of Westmoreland, called on all Catholics to take up arms in defence of their true faith as they occupied the Northern city of Durham.

The Origins of the English Reformation Reconsidered

How different might the first years of the English Reformation look if we try to view them forwards rather than backwards, remembering that the first generation of converts to reform were not early ‘Protestants,’ but late medieval Catholic Christians?

An evening with Philippa Gregory : The King's Curse

British author Philippa Gregory delighted a packed auditorium last night in Toronto, as she spoke about the way she writes historical fiction, her views on Henry VIII, and the travails of going on tour.

Never the Twain Shall Part: A Comparison and Analysis of Irish and English Marriage Laws Following the English Conquest of Ireland

tudor marriage

The expansion of English rule into Ireland during the reign of the Tudors has generated a tremendous amount of historical writing. Within this subject, several schools of thought have emerged. One has examined the English invasion in light of the Tudors themselves.

CONFERENCES: Beyond Iconophobia: 'Decorative' art and the visual culture of Early Modern England

The following piece is my summary of a brilliant paper given by Tara Hamling on at the Institute of Historical Research on art, religion and visual culture in Early Modern England.

CONFERENCES: Bookend Brides – Tudor Queens First and Last

What did it mean to be a queen consort in the 1540s? What did it mean to be a Queen consort at the end of the Middle Ages? Four authors: Linda Porter, Vanora Bennett, Elizabeth Fremantle and Joanna Hickson, examine the lives of Catherine of Valois and Catherine Parr.

Sir Thomas More

He may have considered becoming a monk but eventually decided to remain a layman after marrying and becoming a Member of Parliament. He was to wear a hair shirt under his clothes for the rest of his life, emulating the Carthusians.


Merton priory was now suppressed, and demolition began immediately. There would have been countless workmen and craftsmen employed at the priory, but would they have been willing to destroy the work of their own hands? All strata of society had difficult decisions to make. Principles could so easily be forgotten, especially where there was a family to feed and no prospect of other employment.

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