Book Review: Everyday Life in Tudor London

I love books about London. Just when you think you’ve heard it all, another writer falls in love with it and gets the inspiration to churn out a new chapter in this city’s unique history. While most books attempt to encompass the entire story from its Roman past to the present day (an exhausting task), […]

Book Review: Winter: A Book for the Season by Felicity Trotman

This book couldn’t have come at a better time. Felicity Trotman has gathered some of the best stories, recipes, poems, and diary entries about the season in one fantastic book: Winter: A Book for the Season. From the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, to pieces Samuel Pepys, Charles Dickens, and Dan Runyon, this delightful collection spans across the […]

1603 AD: Shakespearean London

What kind of a place was Shakespeare’s London? We’re taking a peek into the first lecture of the series, a ‘teaser’ on London in 1603.

‘Your Servant Sir what news from Tripoli?!’: A Coffeehouse Tour in London

I jumped at the opportunity to go on a tour dedicated to London’s seventeenth and eighteenth century coffeehouses. Dr. Matthew Green was once again at the helm of this tour, a fun, two hour, caffeine-fest in central London.

5 Creepy Victorian Fads

Victorians became enamoured with the occult, mediums, magic, séances and ghosts to name but a few. Here are 5 creepy things that were popular during the Victorian period.

The most popular boys’ names in Tudor England

What were the most popular names for boys in England during the 16th century? In his book Names and Naming Patterns in England 1538-1700, Scott Smith-Bannister looked at the records of tens of thousands of names to answer this question.

The most popular girls’ names in Tudor England

What were the most popular names for girls in England during the 16th century?

Places to See: Hogarth House

Looking for a place to visit while in London but don’t have a lot of time? Visit Hogarth House. The home of famed English satirist, painter and engraver, William Hogarth.

BOOK REVIEW: The Devil in the Marshalsea by Antonia Hodgson

My review of the fantastic new thriller by Antonia Hodgson: The Devil in the Marshalsea.

Never the Twain Shall Part: A Comparison and Analysis of Irish and English Marriage Laws Following the English Conquest of Ireland

The expansion of English rule into Ireland during the reign of the Tudors has generated a tremendous amount of historical writing. Within this subject, several schools of thought have emerged. One has examined the English invasion in light of the Tudors themselves.

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